Innvandring

Islamiseringen av Frankrike året 2015

Frankrike trenger å doble antallet moskeer til over 4 000. Kirker må gjøres om til moskeer, sier sentral muslimsk leder. Rundt syv millioner av landets befolkning (i overkant av 10 prosent) antas å ha muslimsk opphav. Flere enn 1 500 personer med fransk tilknytning er involvert i terrornettverk i Syria og Irak.

Frankrike trenger å doble antallet moskeer til over 4 000. Kirker må gjøres om til moskeer, sier sentral muslimsk leder. Rundt syv millioner av landets befolkning (i overkant av 10 prosent) antas å ha muslimsk opphav. Flere enn 1 500 personer med fransk tilknytning er involvert i terrornettverk i Syria og Irak. President François Hollande kaller fjoråret for et forferdelig terrorår, og advarer mot mer terror på fransk jord i 2016.  Terrortrusselen er på «det høyeste nivået».

Soeren Kern hos Gatestone Institute har tatt for seg Frankrike 2015 i perspektivet innvandring og islam. Jeg formoder vi alle vet hvor vi var 7. januar i fjor, da hedersmenn og -kvinner i Europas fremste satiremagasin, Charlie Hebdo, ble massakrert. Jeg satt i Marbeilla i ferd med å åpne manus på Islam. Den 11. landeplage. Sjokket sitter fremdeles i ryggmargen da nyheten om terrorangrepet ble sendt ut over kloden.

Oppsummeringen av Frankrikes trøstesløse tilstand starter med den sedvanlige bilbrenningen, rundt 40 000 bilder i året. Merk meningsmålingen i slutten av januar i fjor der hele 53 prosent sier de mener Frankrike er i krig.

Mannen bak massakren på jøder 9. januar i Paris.

Mannen bak massakren på jøder 9. januar i Paris.

    JANUARY

January 1. The Interior Ministry announced the most anticipated statistic of the year: a total of 940 cars and trucks were torched across France on New Year’s Eve, a 12% decrease from the 1,067 vehicles burned during the annual ritual on the same holiday in 2014. Car burnings, commonplace in France, are often attributed to rival Muslim gangs that compete with each other for the media spotlight over which can cause the most destruction. An estimated 40,000 cars are burned in France every year.

January 3. A 23-year-old Muslim man in Metz tried to strangle a police officer while shouting “Allahu Akbar!” (“Allah is the greatest!”). The assault took place at the police station after the man, who was arrested for purse-snatching, asked the officer to bring him a glass of water. When the policeman opened the cell door, the man lunged at him. The officer was rescued by a colleague who saw the scene unfold on a video surveillance camera.

January 7-9. A series of jihadist attacks in Paris left 17 people dead. The first and deadliest of the attacks occurred on January 7, when French-born Islamic radicals Chérif and Saïd Kouachistormed the offices of the magazine Charlie Hebdo and fatally shot eight employees, two police officers, and two others, and injured eleven other people. On January 8, a third assailant in the attacks, Amedy Coulibaly, shot and killed municipal police officer Clarissa Jean-Philippe in Montrouge, a suburb of Paris. On January 9, Coulibaly entered a Hyper Cacher kosher supermarket in Paris, killed four people and took several hostages. Coulibaly was killed when police stormed the store. His female accomplice, Hayat Boumeddiene, France’s “most wanted woman,” remains at large and is believed to have fled to Syria.

January 18. A poll by the firm, Institut français d’opinion publique (IFOP), published by Journal du Dimanche, showed that 42% of French people oppose the publication of cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammed, such as those published by Charlie Hebdo, and indicated they believed there should be “limitations on free speech online and on social networks.” The vast majority (81%) said they favored stripping French nationality from dual nationals who have committed an act of terrorism on French soil. More than two-thirds (68%) said that French citizens should be banned from returning to the country if “they are suspected of having gone to fight in countries or regions controlled by terrorist groups.”

January 20. Prime Minister Manuel Valls said the terrorist attacks exposed a “territorial, social, ethnic apartheid” that is plaguing France. In a speech described as one of the strongest indictments of French society ever by a government figure, Valls said there was an urgent need to fight discrimination, especially in impoverished suburbs that are home to many Muslim immigrants. He said that despite years of government efforts to improve conditions in run-down neighborhoods, many people have been relegated to living in ghettos. He added:

“The social misery is compounded by daily discrimination, because someone does not have the right family name, the right skin color, or because she is a woman. I am not making excuses, but we have to look at the reality of our country.”

January 21. Valls announced a €736 million ($835 million) program to augment its anti-terrorism defenses amid a rapidly expanding jihadist threat. He said the government would hire and train 2,680 new anti-terrorist judges, security agents, police officers, electronic eavesdroppers and analysts over the next three years. The government will also spend €480 million on new weapons and protective gear for police. The initiative includes an enhanced online presence based on a new government website called “Stop Djihadisme.”

January 27. Police arrested five suspected jihadists, aged 26 to 44, in dawn raids in Lunel, a small town near the Mediterranean coast. At least ten, and possibly as many as 20 people from the town — with a population of just 25,000 — have travelled to Syria and Iraq to fight with the Islamic State.

January 28. An Ipsos/Sopra-Steria poll produced for Le Monde and Europe 1 Radio found that 53% of French citizens believe the country is “at war” and 51% feel that Islam is “incompatible” with the values of French society.

Also in January, artwork depicting women’s shoes on Muslim prayer rugs was removed from an exhibition in the Paris suburb of Clichy-la-Garenne after the Federation of Islamic Associations of Clichy warned it might provoke “uncontrollable, irresponsible incidents.” The artwork, made by the French-Algerian artist Zoulikha Bouabdellah, included high-heel shoes placed on the center of prayer rugs in shades of blue, white and red, symbolizing the French flag. She said she did not consider the work to be blasphemous, but curator Christine Ollier said it would be removed to “avoid polemics.” The act of self-censorship was criticized by other artists, who said that the freedom of expression was being undermined.

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